Concept and Nature of Social Justice

 An Introduction

The concept of social justice is important to social work practice. Social justice issues have traditionally been a focus of social work. It is one of the fundamental principles of professional social work. From the outset, social workers have grappled with the difficult relationship between "case" and "cause," and between alleviating individual suffering and bringing about societal change that tackles the structural defects and inequalities in society that contribute to the problems people face. Social workers are concerned with social justice on both the micro (individual) and macro (large-scale) levels. According to the National Association of Social Workers, one of the basic guiding principles is social justice.

of social work that focuses on creating equal economic, political, and social rights Social workers fight inequality and oppression in a variety of methods, with a general emphasis on assisting people with the most pressing needs (NASW, 2014). Simply put, social justice is the promotion of a just society via the challenge of injustice and the appreciation of variety. It exists when all individuals share a shared humanity and, as a result, have a right to equal treatment, support for their human rights, and a fair distribution of community resources. This is a point of view shared by the social work profession. Social workers strive to provide equal access and opportunity for all people, particularly those who are subjected to inequitable social settings in society. According to the IFSW (2014) global definition of social work, "social work is a practice-based profession and an academic discipline that supports social change and development, social cohesiveness, and people's empowerment and emancipation." Social work is founded on the principles of social justice, human rights, communal responsibility, and diversity. Social work involves people and structures to address life difficulties and improve well-being, based on ideas of social work, social sciences, humanities, and indigenous knowledge." The worldwide definition of social work makes it clear that the aim of social justice is always the primary goal of social work practice.

Concept and Nature of Socia Justice 

Social justice is an essential idea in social work practise. Traditionally, social justice issues have been a focus of social work. It is one of the basic tenets of professional social work. Social workers have always struggled with the complex link between "case" and "cause," and between treating individual suffering and bringing about societal change that addresses the structural flaws and injustices that contribute to the difficulties people encounter. Social workers care about social justice at both the micro (individual) and macro (large-scale) levels. One of the fundamental guiding principles, according to the National Association of Social Workers, is social justice.

of social activity aimed at achieving equal economic, political, and social rights Social workers use a range of strategies to combat inequality and oppression, with a general emphasis on supporting individuals with the most immediate needs (NASW, 2014). Simply expressed, social justice is the development of a just society via the confrontation of injustice and the appreciation of diversity. It exists when all individuals have a common humanity and, as a result, have the right to equal treatment, protection of their human rights, and equitable allocation of community resources. This is a viewpoint held by the social work profession. Social workers work hard to ensure that all people have equal access and opportunity, especially those who are subjected to inequitable social conditions in society. "Social work is a practice-based profession and an academic field that supports social change and development, social cohesion, and people's empowerment and emancipation," according to the IFSW (2014) worldwide definition of social work. The ideas of social justice, human rights, communal responsibility, and diversity underpin social work. Based on principles from social work, social sciences, humanities, and indigenous knowledge, social work includes people and structures to address life challenges and increase well-being." According to the global definition of social work, the objective of social justice is always the primary purpose of social work practise. refers to what you are owed as well as what you owe others (Miller, 2003).
The United Nations (2006) addresses social justice from a human rights standpoint and provides critical mandates for international and national activities. Human well-being is at the heart of social justice. The application of justice to humanity is firmly rooted in the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948) Charter, which states that human rights are founded on respect for the dignity and value of all human beings and seek to provide freedom from fear and lack. Social justice is concerned with the equitable distribution of economic and social advancement for all individuals.
The pursuit of social justice has always been both a struggle and a myth for social workers and their immediate predecessors in charitable organisations and settlement homes, according to social work histories. Even in the days of charity organisations and settlements, social workers have traditionally done a wide range of tasks, both collectively and individually (Banks, 2004). In social work, we must be especially careful that overuse and irresponsible application hollow down the concept of social justice, rendering it virtually worthless (Harrison et al 2007). "Social" refers to how individuals and groups of people interact, whereas "justice" relates to fairness or equal treatment in critical topics.
As a result, social justice can be defined literally as fair and equal relationships between individuals and social groupings (Behr, 2005). The social work professional's assistance to clients is based on the value of social justice. Clients who seek professional social worker assistance are heavily influenced by their economic and social situations, as well as the economic and social structure of the society in which they reside. Social justice is defined simply as "... creating a just society by confronting injustice and valuing diversity."

Comments

Thank You

Archive

Contact Form

Send