12 Domain of Cognitive Psychology.

 12 Domain of Cognitive Psychology

  1. Cognitive Neuroscience 
  2. Perception
  3. Pattern Recognition
  4. Attention
  5. Consciousness 
  6. Memory 
  7. Representation of Knowledge
  8. Imagery 
  9. Language 
  10. Developmental Psychology 
  11. Thinking and Concept Formation
  12. Human and Artificial Intelligence.

In the last article, we learned about Research Methods in Cognitive Psychology, in this article let's try to understand the various domains of Cognitive Psychology. Let’s get started.

Modern cognitive psychology freely, draws theories and techniques; from twelve principal areas of research Each area, in brief, is described below:

1- Cognitive Neuroscience:

Cognitive psychologists and cognitive neuroscientists have just recently created a tight working partnership. So far, this partnership has resulted in some of the most intriguing advances in the study of human mental character. Cognitive psychologists are looking for neurological explanations for their findings, and neuroscientists are looking to cognitive psychologists to explain laboratory discoveries. Basic electrochemical processes in the brain and nervous system support every aspect of the cognitive process, from sensation to memory.

2. Perception:

Perception is the branch of psychology that is directly concerned with the detection and interpretation of sensory stimuli. We have a strong grasp of the sensitivity of the human organism to sensory signals, as well as the way we interpret sensory signals, thanks to perception tests. Many of the components of this process have been identified through the experimental study of perception. However, studying vision alone does not sufficiently explain for expected performance; other cognitive systems, such as pattern recognition, attention, consciousness, and memory, are involved.

3. Pattern Recognition:

Environmental stimuli are rarely seen as isolated sensory events; rather, they are viewed as part of a larger, more significant pattern. What we perceive – what we see, hear, feel, taste, or smell – is virtually always part of a complicated network of sensory stimuli. Consider the reading difficulty. Reading is a challenging task in which the reader must create a meaningful pattern out of an otherwise meaningless array of lines and curves. The reader can retrieve meaning from their memories by organizing the inputs that make up letters and words. The entire process takes a fraction of a second and considering all the neuroanatomical and cognitive systems involved, this achievement – executed on a regular basis by people of all occupations – is astounding.

4. Attention:

Although humans are information-gathering beings, we are also highly selective in the amount and sort of information which we attend under typical conditions. Our information processing capacity appears to be confined to two levels: sensory and cognitive. We can become overloaded if we are exposed to too many sensory cues at once; if we try to process too many events in memory, we can become overloaded, which can lead to a breakdown in performance. We've all felt the same way at some point in our lives.


5- Consciousness:

The definition of consciousness is "the current awareness of external or internal situations." Despite being rejected as "unscientific" by behaviorists, the term consciousness and the concept it conveys did not fade away. For many people, consciousness and unconscious thoughts (such as those experienced on a first date) are extremely real. When you look at your watch while studying and it reads "10:42 (P.M.)," you are mindful, or aware, of that external signal. However, your viewing of the time triggers another conscious idea, one that was triggered by reading the time but comes from "within." "It's becoming late: I'd better finish this chapter and go to bed," that conscious thinking might be. Consciousness has recently earned fresh credibility and is currently a topic of significant study in modern cognitive psychology.

6- Memory:

Memory and perception act in tandem. Our perception, short-term memory, and long-term memory provide us with the knowledge we need. The most obvious long-term storage is linguistic knowledge. We take words from LTM and correctly use them. We may recall facts about an incident that happened years ago in a split second. Such knowledge is not derived from an instantaneous perceptual experience; rather, it is stored in the LTM alongside a large number of other facts.

7-Representation of Knowledge:

The representation of knowledge is crucial to all human cognition: how information is symbolised and paired with the objects stored in the brain. This element of cognition consists of two components: the conceptual representation of knowledge in the mind and the manner in which the brain stores and processes information. Different people's conceptual representations can be rather different. Despite these fundamental differences in knowledge representations, most individuals experience and express experience in ways that allow them to coexist in the environment. This information's content is likewise vastly different. Our neurological web, on the other hand, entraps information and experiences and stores them in structures that are shared by all human brains

8- Imagery:

Internal representations of knowledge are of particular interest to cognitive psychologists. A cognitive map, a type of internal representation of the juxtaposed buildings, streets, street signs, spotlights, and so on, is used to construct mental images of the environment. We can glean important cues from the cognitive maps. Although the experimental study of mental imagery is still in its early stages, some noteworthy research has just been published.

9- Language:

Language knowledge is one type of knowledge that all human societies share. Language is the primary mechanism through which we learn and express knowledge; hence, cognitive psychology is concerned with how language is employed. Human language development represents a distinct type of abstraction that is fundamental to cognition. Language processing is a critical component of data processing and storage. Language also has an impact on perception, which is a fundamental part of cognition.

10- Developmental Psychology:

Another key field of cognitive psychology that has received a lot of attention is developmental psychology. Recent developmental cognitive psychology investigations and hypotheses have considerably expanded our understanding of how cognitive processes develop. We have all lived through childhood and adolescence as adults, and we share maturational experiences with all other members of our species.

11- Thinking and Concept Formation:

Another key field of cognitive psychology that has received a lot of attention is developmental psychology. Recent developmental cognitive psychology investigations and hypotheses have considerably expanded our understanding of how cognitive processes develop. We have all lived through childhood and adolescence as adults, and we share maturational experiences with all other members of our species.

12- Human and Artificial Intelligence:

Human intelligence is defined as the ability to acquire, recall, and apply knowledge in order to comprehend concrete and abstract concepts as well as the relationships between objects and ideas, to comprehend a language, to follow instructions, to convert verbal descriptions into actions, and to behave in accordance with the rules, and to apply knowledge meaningfully.

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