How Social Casework Has Changed Over Time

Social casework has evolved over time, from its early focus on individual and family problems to a more holistic approach that addresses the social and environmental factors that contribute to people's difficulties. This blog post explores the history of social casework and how it has changed to meet the needs of a changing society.

  1. Charity organization society (London) (1869)
  2. Charity organisation society (USA) (1877)
  3. Emergence of Freudian theory (1895)
  4. Publication of a book on social case work (1917)

The Charity Organisation Society (COS) was founded in London in 1869. The COS was a philanthropic organization that aimed to help the poor by providing them with financial assistance and social services. The COS was also a pioneer in the development of social casework, which is a method of helping people with social and emotional problems.

The first book on social case work was published in 1917 by Mary Richmond. Richmond was a social worker who is considered to be the founder of social casework. Her book, "Social Diagnosis," outlined the principles of social casework and how it could be used to help people with social and emotional problems.

The emergence of Freudian theory in 1895 had a major impact on the development of social casework. Freudian theory provided social workers with a new understanding of human behavior and how to help people with emotional problems.

The Charity Organisation Society (COS) was founded in London in 1869. The COS was a philanthropic organization that aimed to help the poor by providing them with financial assistance and social services. The COS was also a pioneer in the development of social casework, which is a method of helping people with social and emotional problems.

The COS was founded by a group of philanthropists who were concerned about the growing problem of poverty in London. The COS believed that the best way to help the poor was to provide them with financial assistance and social services, but they also believed that it was important to help the poor help themselves.

The COS developed a system of district visiting, in which volunteers would visit poor families in their homes to assess their needs and provide them with assistance. The COS also developed a system of friendly visiting, in which volunteers would visit poor families to provide them with companionship and emotional support.

The COS also played a role in the development of social casework. Social casework is a method of helping people with social and emotional problems. The COS believed that social casework could be used to help the poor overcome their problems and become self-sufficient.

The COS was a major force in the development of social work in the United Kingdom. The COS's methods and principles were adopted by other social work organizations, and the COS's training programs helped to train a generation of social workers.

The COS declined in the early 20th century, as more progressive social work organizations emerged. However, the COS's legacy can still be seen in the field of social work today.

Here are some of the key principles of the Charity Organisation Society:

  • The importance of individual responsibility: The COS believed that people should be responsible for their own well-being, and that they should not rely on charity to solve their problems.
  • The importance of investigation: The COS believed that it was important to investigate the needs of each individual before providing them with assistance.
  • The importance of coordination: The COS believed that it was important to coordinate the efforts of different charities to avoid duplication of services.
  • The importance of self-help: The COS believed that people should be helped to help themselves, and that they should not become dependent on charity.

The Charity Organisation Society had a significant impact on the development of social work in the United Kingdom. The COS's methods and principles were adopted by other social work organizations, and the COS's training programs helped to train a generation of social workers. The COS's legacy can still be seen in the field of social work today.

Charity organisation society (USA) (1877)

The Charity Organisation Society (COS) was founded in Buffalo, New York, in 1877. The COS was a philanthropic organization that aimed to help the poor by providing them with financial assistance and social services. The COS was also a pioneer in the development of social casework, which is a method of helping people with social and emotional problems.

The COS was founded by a group of philanthropists who were concerned about the growing problem of poverty in the United States. The COS believed that the best way to help the poor was to provide them with financial assistance and social services, but they also believed that it was important to help the poor help themselves.

The COS developed a system of district visiting, in which volunteers would visit poor families in their homes to assess their needs and provide them with assistance. The COS also developed a system of friendly visiting, in which volunteers would visit poor families to provide them with companionship and emotional support.

The COS also played a role in the development of social casework. Social casework is a method of helping people with social and emotional problems. The COS believed that social casework could be used to help the poor overcome their problems and become self-sufficient.

The COS was a major force in the development of social work in the United States. The COS's methods and principles were adopted by other social work organizations, and the COS's training programs helped to train a generation of social workers.

The COS declined in the early 20th century, as more progressive social work organizations emerged. However, the COS's legacy can still be seen in the field of social work today.

Here are some of the key principles of the Charity Organisation Society:

  • The importance of individual responsibility: The COS believed that people should be responsible for their own well-being, and that they should not rely on charity to solve their problems.
  • The importance of investigation: The COS believed that it was important to investigate the needs of each individual before providing them with assistance.
  • The importance of coordination: The COS believed that it was important to coordinate the efforts of different charities to avoid duplication of services.
  • The importance of self-help: The COS believed that people should be helped to help themselves, and that they should not become dependent on charity.

The Charity Organisation Society had a significant impact on the development of social work in the United States. The COS's methods and principles were adopted by other social work organizations, and the COS's training programs helped to train a generation of social workers. The COS's legacy can still be seen in the field of social work today.

The emergence of Freudian theory in 1895

The emergence of Freudian theory in 1895 had a profound impact on the field of psychology. Sigmund Freud's theory of the unconscious mind challenged the prevailing view of human behavior, which was based on the belief that people are rational beings who are in control of their own thoughts and actions.

Freud's theory proposed that the unconscious mind is a powerful force that shapes our thoughts, feelings, and behavior. He argued that the unconscious mind is made up of repressed memories, desires, and impulses that we are not aware of. These repressed urges can sometimes manifest themselves in our behavior in ways that we do not understand.

Freud's theory was controversial when it was first introduced, but it eventually gained widespread acceptance. His ideas have had a major impact on the way that we think about human behavior, and they have also influenced the development of psychotherapy.

The emergence of Freudian theory in 1895 was a major turning point in the history of psychology. Freud's ideas challenged the prevailing view of human behavior and they have had a lasting impact on the way that we think about the mind.

Here are some of the key concepts of Freudian theory:

  • The unconscious mind: The unconscious mind is a powerful force that shapes our thoughts, feelings, and behavior. It is made up of repressed memories, desires, and impulses that we are not aware of.
  • The id, ego, and superego: Freud believed that the mind is made up of three parts: the id, the ego, and the superego. The id is the impulsive part of the mind that is driven by pleasure. The ego is the rational part of the mind that mediates between the id and the superego. The superego is the moral part of the mind that enforces social norms.
  • The Oedipus complex: The Oedipus complex is a theory of child development that proposes that young boys develop a sexual desire for their mothers and a sense of rivalry with their fathers.
  • The defense mechanisms: Freud believed that we use defense mechanisms to protect ourselves from anxiety. Some common defense mechanisms include denial, repression, projection, and rationalization.

Freudian theory has been criticized for being too deterministic and for failing to account for the role of social factors in human behavior. However, Freud's ideas have had a major impact on the way that we think about the mind, and they continue to be influential in the field of psychology today.

Publication of a book on social case work (1917)

The first book on social casework was published in 1917 by Mary Richmond. The book was titled Social Diagnosis and it outlined the principles of social casework and how it could be used to help people with social and emotional problems.

Richmond was a social worker who is considered to be the founder of social casework. She worked for the Charity Organisation Society (COS) in New York City and she was instrumental in developing the COS's approach to social casework.

Social Diagnosis was a landmark publication in the field of social work. It was the first book to provide a comprehensive overview of social casework and it helped to establish social casework as a legitimate profession.

The book was divided into two parts. The first part discussed the principles of social casework, such as the importance of assessment, diagnosis, and treatment planning. The second part of the book provided case studies that illustrated how social casework could be used to help people with a variety of problems.

Social Diagnosis was a well-received book and it helped to popularize social casework. It is still considered to be an important text in the field of social work today.

Here are some other books that were published on social casework in the early 20th century:

  • Social Treatment: Principles and Methods by Helen Harris Perlman (1957)
  • Casework: A Problem-Solving Approach by James W. Whittaker and John W. Keith (1974)
  • The Practice of Social Work by Robert V. Wilson and Steven R. Mayer (1986)
  • Social Work Practice: A Critical Thinker’s Guide by Bruce A. Thyer (2002)

These books all provide different perspectives on social casework and they can be helpful for social workers who are interested in learning more about the field.

Questions Asked in

2013 September UGC NET  in Social Work Paper 3 -Q-2

Put the following events in the order of their occurrence:

i. Charity organisation society (London)

ii. Publication of a book on social case work

iii. Charity organization society (USA)

iv. Emergence of Freudian theory

Codes:

(A) i iii ii iv

(B) iv ii i iii

(C) i iv ii iii

(D) iii iv ii i

 The correct answer is (D). The events in chronological order are:

  1. Charity organization society (London) (1869)
  2. Charity organisation society (USA) (1877)
  3. Emergence of Freudian theory (1895)
  4. Publication of a book on social case work (1917)

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